Things to do

Makah Cultural Center

The Makah Cultural and Research Center is world famous. Many of the items in the museum are from the "Ozette Dig," which yielded Makah artifacts from a village partially buried in a mudslide in the 1500s. The Ozette archeological collection is...

Forks Timber Museum

The museum displays the tools and history of logging, including The Logger, a 10-foot tall chainsaw-carved cedar statue surrounded by name plaques honoring past timber workers. Exhibits also highlight the history, pioneers, agriculture and Indian...

Cape Flattery Trail

As you near Neah Bay, look for tufted puffin nesting on the sea stacks from spring to early summer, and common murres perched on Tatoosh Island. Look in the water for bobbing sooty shearwaters. During the spring thousands of migrating hawks,...

Dungeness Spit and Lighthouse

At 5.5 miles in length, the Dungeness Spit is the world's longest naturally occurring sandspit and home to the Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge is a sanctuary for over 250 species of birds, 41 species of land mammals and eight...

Fort Worden State Park

Perched at the northern entrance to Puget Sound near Port Townsend, Fort Worden State Park, a military base that was commissioned in 1902, is a legendary gathering place. With a 360 degree panorama of the Olympic and Cascade Mountains, the Fort's...

Olympic Peninsula Native American People

The Olympic Peninsula is home to many tribes of native people, including the Quinault , Hoh, Quileute, Makah, Elwha Klallam and Jamestown S'Klallam. From culinary influence, native art, traditional song, dance and festivals, there are many...

Eight Lighthouses on the Olympic Peninsula

Stop along the way and visit some of the historical lighthouses on the Olympic Peninsula.

POINT WILSON
Point Wilson marks the west entrance into the Puget Sound. It is the turning point from the Strait of Juan de...

Parks on the Olympic Peninsula

Olympic National Park is 922,000 acres of stunning alpine and coastal wilderness. Over 3 million people visit every year, and yet the park still retains an untouched, natural feel. It's known as the focal point...

Kayaking the Hood Canal

The Hood Canal's protected waters are ideal for kayaking, beginners, novices, families, and seasoned paddlers alike. Many sheltered coves, bays, and inlets provide calm waters with serene beaches and beautiful landscapes. Popular launch sites...

Hiking in the Hood Canal Region

Quilcene and Brinnon are nestled between the beautiful Hood Canal and the Hood Canal Ranger District of the Olympic National Forest. This unique location leaves endless opportunities for hiking and visiting viewpoints. One-hundred and ten miles...